History Podcasts

Rhebal SP-1195 - History

Rhebal SP-1195 - History

Rhebal

(SP-1195: t. 157; 1. 52'4" b. 10'2"; dr. 2'6"; s. 16 k.; a. 1 1-pdr., 1 mg.)

Rhebal (SP-1195), a motorboat built in 1917 by the Great Lakes Boat Building Corp., Milwaukee, Wise., was acquired by the Navy 15 August 1917 on free lease from her owners A. R Meyer and W. K. Hill of Boston, Mass. Placed in service 24 August, Rhebal served on section patrol in the 2d Naval District through World War I and was returned to her owner in March 1919.


یواس‌اس ربال (اس‌پی-۱۱۹۵)

یواس‌اس ربال (اس‌پی-۱۱۹۵) (به انگلیسی: USS Rhebal (SP-1195) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۵۲ فوت ۴ اینچ (۱۵٫۹۵ متر)، و سرعتش ۱۶ گره دریایی بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۱۷ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس ربال (اس‌پی-۱۱۹۵)
پیشینه
مالک
تکمیل ساخت: ۱۹۱۷
به دست آورده شده: ۱۵ اوت ۱۹۱۷
اعزام: ۲۴ اوت ۱۹۱۷
مشخصات اصلی
گنجایش: 157 gross register tons
درازا: ۵۲ فوت ۴ اینچ (۱۵٫۹۵ متر)
پهنا: ۱۰ فوت ۲ اینچ (۳٫۱۰ متر)
آبخور: ۲ فوت ۶ اینچ (۰٫۷۶ متر)
سرعت: 16 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Born Too Early for Big Money, Jacobs Still Has Good Life in Golf

If you assess Tommy Jacobs’ golf career strictly from a financial standpoint, you quickly draw the conclusion that he was born too soon.

The amount of money Jacobs won in 14 years on the PGA Tour, $227,376, would have relegated him to 44th place on the earnings list for 1987. His season high of $37,072 was good for 12th place in 1964.

Jacobs wasn’t just a hanger-on, either. He won four tournaments and fell just short of a prestigious prize, finishing second to Jack Nicklaus in a playoff at the 1966 Masters. He shot a career-low 62 in the 1962 Utah Open, which he won, and a 64 in the 1964 U.S. Open, in which he finished 10th. He was a member of the United States Ryder and Diamond Head Cup teams that beat Great Britain, the latter in an event for club pros.

One can only speculate how much money Jacobs, a native of Denver and a resident of Del Mar, would have made in prize money and appearance fees for corporate outings if he were on the tour today.

But all this is of little concern to Jacobs, who at 53 is as eager as a rookie in his new role as golf director at the soon-to-open Rancho Santa Fe Farms Golf Club. He says he enjoyed the tour a lot more than the golfers do these days.

“Sure, the money is astronomical today, but I have no regrets,” said Jacobs, who was on the tour from 1957 through 1970. “We had something that they don’t have anymore. We had much more camaraderie.

“We weren’t jumping on planes right after the tournaments ended. We would go back to our hotel, have pizza together and rehash the weekend. That meant a lot to us.

“Gene Littler pulled a trailer around the country, and so did Arnold Palmer. Now Arnie has his own Lear jet. There isn’t the old, down-to-earth togetherness.”

Earning money on tour isn’t just fun anymore it’s a necessity.

“There’s a lot more pressure,” Jacobs said. “The lesser lights, the ones without sponsors, need $50,000 or so a year just to cover expenses. If we spent $10 a night for a room, we screamed like stuck pigs. We stayed in nicer hotels, too, not fleabags. I don’t recall what our break-even point was, but it was minimal.”

Jacobs cited his experience in 1958 to illustrate how easy it was to go from rags to semi-riches.

“I was broke when I started the year in the Los Angeles Open,” he said. “I won a nice check there, around $1,000, and then I finished 10th in the U.S. Open. Still, I was kind of pressing because I had led some tournaments going into the last round and hadn’t been able to win.

“Then I won the Denver Open, and I was on my way. I wound up winning $12,500 and finished 39th for the year. After that, I had enough money to get married and buy a new Cadillac. I always traveled by car, and I bought new Cadillacs every year. The Cadillac people gave the golfers a deal. We could trade them in for more than we paid for them.”

The prize money on the tour keeps going up and up. Last year, Curtis Strange set a record of $925,941, smashing Greg Norman’s year-old mark by $272,645. Paul Azinger earned $822,481.

“And that’s only part of it,” Jacobs said. “The corporate outings are veritable gold mines. Palmer’s one-day fee is a minimum of $25,000, and he probably plays 15 or 20 of them a year.

“You don’t see Dave Stockton’s name much anymore, but he probably makes $250,000 a year on those outings. I don’t think he made $40,000 on the tour last year (he earned only $18,206).”

Besides the 1958 Denver Open and the 1962 Utah Open, Jacobs won the San Diego Open (now the Shearson Lehman Hutton Andy Williams Open) in 1962 and the Palm Springs Desert Classic (now the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic) in 1964. He earned his biggest purse of all, $25,000, in a non-tour event, the CBS Golf Classic, which he won with Dave Marr in 1965.

“I holed out of a bunker on the last hole to win over Ray Floyd and Bobby Nichols,” Jacobs said. “That was very satisfying. Winning the Desert Classic was worth only $7,500. The next year, first prize was $15,000 and a new car. That was when Bob Hope and Chrysler came in.”

Jacobs’ near miss in the Masters came 14 years after he had achieved the honor of being the youngest player--17 years old--in the tournament’s history.

“I got into the ’52 Masters by being a semifinalist in the national amateur in ’51,” Jacobs said. “I had won every junior title there was in California. I shot four 79s in the Masters, and I never highlighted my being the youngest at the time. I never knew it going in or coming out. Later, people made a big deal out of it.”

Joining the tour then was easy compared to the hassle involved today. There was no such thing as a qualifying school, in which the survivors of regionals from across the country play six nerve-wracking rounds in an attempt to earn their tour cards.

“All we had to do was fill out an application and list our credits,” Jacobs said. “A four-man board voted on us.”

After the 1970 season, Jacobs quit the tour to become golf director at the La Costa Resort Hotel and Spa. He directed the MONY Tournament of Champions at La Costa for 15 years, leaving in 1986 to take on his new venture at Rancho Santa Fe Farms.

“I decided in ’70 to look for a club job,” he said. “My children were in school, and I was tired of being away from my family.

“I came on board at Rancho Santa Fe Farms May 1 of ’86. It’s another dimension I’ve always wanted to get into. I’ve been involved in a lot of decision-making in putting the course together. Pete and Perry Dye are the architects of the course, and our involvement is not in telling them what to do. It’s telling them what we want.

“I’m not really a golf pro here. I’m just a people manager. We expect to have the back nine ready for limited member play by Sept. 19 or 20, and the complete 18-hole course done by Nov. 1.”

Jacobs said the course will be a “fair” one, playing anywhere from 6,000 to 7,000 yards from multiple tees.

“I don’t anticipate having any major tournaments here,” he said. “Maybe we’ll have something like the Southern California Amateur. We’ll cater more to amateur-type events.”

The new club is private, and to say the least, quite expensive. The cost of a membership opened at $37,500, has risen to $42,500, will climb further to $47,000 and finally to $62,500. It’s an equity club, Jacobs said, in which members will have the option to take over the club when they reach a certain number.

Since turning 50, Jacobs has played a few tournaments a year on the PGA Senior Tour, earning $29,701. But his new project has put that career on hold for the time being.

“Right now I don’t have much chance to play,” he said. “I’ve played in only two tournaments this year, so I’m on the borderline of losing my exemption. You have to play six a year, and one of mine was the Legends of Golf (a non-tour event), so I need five more.”

The senior tour has grown tremendously in stature in recent years and will get bigger than ever when Nicklaus and Lee Trevino become eligible to join in 1989-90.

Since Gary Player has fared well as a senior and Palmer hasn’t, Jacobs was asked for a prediction on Nicklaus and Trevino.

“I think Trevino will be a star and Nicklaus won’t be,” Jacobs said. “Lee is a great competitor, and Jack is so diversified that he doesn’t have the time to concentrate on his game.

“It’s somewhat like the comparison between Player and Palmer. Player is very serious about it. Arnie still enjoys the game, but he doesn’t have the same goals. Winning isn’t that big for him anymore. Mostly, he wants to keep his name before the public.”

And Jacobs’ own golf future?

“When I left La Costa, I considered playing the senior tour full-time,” he said. “Once I’m settled, I’d like to play at least a dozen tournaments a year.


Niles Canyon Railway - 2020

On 12/6/2020 I rode on a fundraiser/photo shoot for the restoration of the Southern Pacific #1744, a Class M-6 2-6-0 "Mogul" type steam locomotive built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Southern Pacific Railroad in November 1901. Images of the 1744 chassis and cab + #s 166, 173 & 185. About 40 people rode on a train pulled by an SW900 Diesel Electric Locomotive, SP #1195. We were following the "Skookum" Steam locomotive #7. History of the Skookum: Deep River Logging No. 7, named "Skookum" is a 2-4-4-2 steam locomotive. It was built in June 1909 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Deep River Logging railroad, where it was used mainly on log trains. It was retired and abandoned in place in a forest following a derailment in 1955. As of September 2018, it was nearing completion of restoration to operating condition at the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad shop in Garibaldi, Oregon. Its first steaming was the following month, but not before problems with its bottom-end (that of the low-pressure engine) were encountered. Afterwards, back to the shop it went, and once the problems are ironed out, Skookum returned to service by the end of 2018. It was completed in early 2019 and ran on the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad. It is in full operating condition. It was sent to the Niles Canyon Railway to be run regularly in July of 2019. History of the 1744: It operated for many years out of Oakland on the SP Western Division and in California’s Central Valley where the Moguls were fondly called “Valley Mallets” by their crews. The locomotive was made famous in later years by operating on several of the last steam railfan excursions on the Southern Pacific. After many years of operating around the United States, the #1744 is returning home to once again operate through Niles Canyon on the last leg of the transcontinental railroad. After retirement from service on the SP in 1958, the locomotive was operated at the Heber Valley Railroad, moved to Texas and restored for a brief period of operation in New Orleans. Iowa Pacific bought the locomotive and ran it on the San Luis & Rio Grande over Colorado’s La Veta Pass in tourist service during 2007 until it was sidelined with boiler issues. The locomotive was disassembled, boiler work started and then stopped. The locomotive has sat disassembled since 2008 with the boiler moving from Alabama to Texas and then back to Colorado during this time. The Pacific Locomotive Association is currently in the process of gathering the pieces together in Colorado for shipment. The boiler will be sent to a contract shop for repairs while the rest of the locomotive will be shipped home to Niles Canyon. The PLA plan to return the #1744 to service will not be a quick or inexpensive proposition but we are looking forward to the future when she will once again steam through Niles Canyon.


ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • APA
  • Standard
  • Harvard
  • Vancouver
  • Author
  • BIBTEX
  • RIS

In: Tectonics , Vol. 12, No. 5, 10.1993, p. 1195-1208.

Research output : Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review

T1 - Denali Fault System of southern Alaska

T2 - An interior strike‐slip structure responding to dextral and sinistral shear coupling

N2 - The Denali fault system (DFS) extends for ∼1200 km, from southeast to south central Alaska. The DFS has been generally regarded as a right‐lateral strike‐slip fault, along which post late Mesozoic offsets of up to 400 km have been suggested. The offset history of the DFS is relatively unconstrained, particularly at its western end. For this study we calculated relative motion vectors at discrete points along the length of the DFS, based on the well‐understood kinematic interaction between the North American, Pacific, and Kula plates, and the following assumptions: (1) The arcuate geometry of the DFS has existed essentially unchanged since the Late Cretaceous (2) The Yukon‐Tanana terrane and other terranes north of the DFS were fixed, in situ, prior to the accretion of the southern Alaskan terranes and (3) Tangential and normal relative motion vector components calculated for points along the DFS using the plate model of Kelley [1993] describe the plate kinematics of the DFS since the Late Cretaceous. The consequent kinematic model for the DFS predicts that left‐lateral stresses have acted upon the western end of the DFS for much of its history, and conflicting senses of shear exist between the eastern and western ends of the system. The offset history of the western end of the Denali fault system should be significantly different than the history of the central and eastern sections consequently, individual crustal blocks in southeast and southwest Alaska may have undergone, respectively, clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. The sense of rotation predicted by our model is in agreement with rotations determined by paleomagnetic studies and provides an alternative model to the “Alaskan orocline” hypotheses.

AB - The Denali fault system (DFS) extends for ∼1200 km, from southeast to south central Alaska. The DFS has been generally regarded as a right‐lateral strike‐slip fault, along which post late Mesozoic offsets of up to 400 km have been suggested. The offset history of the DFS is relatively unconstrained, particularly at its western end. For this study we calculated relative motion vectors at discrete points along the length of the DFS, based on the well‐understood kinematic interaction between the North American, Pacific, and Kula plates, and the following assumptions: (1) The arcuate geometry of the DFS has existed essentially unchanged since the Late Cretaceous (2) The Yukon‐Tanana terrane and other terranes north of the DFS were fixed, in situ, prior to the accretion of the southern Alaskan terranes and (3) Tangential and normal relative motion vector components calculated for points along the DFS using the plate model of Kelley [1993] describe the plate kinematics of the DFS since the Late Cretaceous. The consequent kinematic model for the DFS predicts that left‐lateral stresses have acted upon the western end of the DFS for much of its history, and conflicting senses of shear exist between the eastern and western ends of the system. The offset history of the western end of the Denali fault system should be significantly different than the history of the central and eastern sections consequently, individual crustal blocks in southeast and southwest Alaska may have undergone, respectively, clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. The sense of rotation predicted by our model is in agreement with rotations determined by paleomagnetic studies and provides an alternative model to the “Alaskan orocline” hypotheses.


Despenser family

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Despenser family, unpopular favourites of England’s King Edward II, who were executed by Edward’s opponents, Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer.

Hugh Le Despenser (in full Hugh Le Despenser, earl of Winchester b. 1262—d. Oct. 27, 1326, Bristol, Gloucestershire, Eng.), also known as Hugh the Elder, was summoned to Parliament as a baron in 1295. He fought in France and Scotland for Edward I and was sent by him on several embassies, including two to the pope. He was one of the few supporters, in 1308, of Piers Gaveston, Edward II’s favourite after Gaveston’s death in 1312 he became the king’s chief adviser until Thomas, earl of Lancaster, leader of the baronial opposition, procured his dismissal from court and council in February 1315. He then worked to further the interests of his son, Hugh Le Despenser (Hugh the Younger d. Nov. 24, 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, Eng.), who had been in the king’s household when he was prince of Wales. The younger Hugh was appointed the king’s chamberlain in 1318, but both father and son were attacked in Parliament by the magnates in 1321 the intense hatred with which the barons regarded the Despensers was due to the enormous wealth that had passed into their hands and to the arrogance and rapacity of the younger Hugh. At last the king was forced to agree to their disinheritance and exile. The elder Hugh went abroad but the younger remained in the Cinque Ports and engaged in piracy.

After the collapse of the opposition at the Battle of Boroughbridge (March 1322), the Despensers returned to power, and the elder Hugh was created earl of Winchester. Hugh the Younger worked to enhance the importance of the chamberlain’s office: he diverted to it from the Exchequer the revenue from certain lands, developed it as a department equipped with its own seal and provided private income for the king. But his administration aroused discontent. He had married (1306) Eleanor, coheiress of Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester (d. 1314). Hugh’s attempt to acquire the sole inheritance had been foiled by a division of Clare’s estates in 1317 but even so he received lands in Glamorgan and Wales. At the rebellion of Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer (1326), both Despensers fled westward with the king. The elder, sent to defend Bristol, surrendered it to Isabella on October 26 and, after summary trial, was hanged the next day. The younger Despenser was captured with the king and tried and hanged a month later.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.


Laws & Policies

The 72nd Pennsylvania infantry monument is silhouetted against gray clouds.

Gettysburg National Military Park is regulated by Federal Law, regulations set forth by the National Park Service and site-specific regulations designed to preserve and protect the resources of the park and Soldiers' National Cemetery, while providing a positive and safe environment for the visitor. These regulations are stated in the Superintendent's Compendium, which is available on this page.

Park Regulations in Brief

    .
  • For visitor safety, handbags and backpacks are not allowed in the Museum and Visitor Center. Please leave them secured in the trunk of your vehicle or hidden under a car seat.
  • Monuments and cannon were placed by veterans of the battle to mark positions and honor the sacrifices made by those organizations. They are irreplaceable historic objects protected by Federal law. Please help preserve them by not climbing, standing or hanging on monuments and cannon carriages.
  • The possession of metal detectors on park property is strictly prohibited. Relic hunting by the use of metal detectors or other means is prohibited and violators will be prosecuted.
  • Collecting of natural and cultural objects, including plants, animals, minerals, stones from walls, or other objects is strictly prohibited.
  • Obey posted speed limits and regulatory signs on park roads and avenues. Park in designated parking lots or on the pavement, not on the grass or road shoulders.
  • Bicycles are allowed on park roads and avenues only. Trail riding and off-road cycling is prohibited.
  • Picnicking is allowed only in designated picnic areas in the park. Please consult the park brochure for locations.
  • Pets must be leashed and attended at all times. Pets are prohibited on the grounds of the Soldiers' National Cemetery and inside the visitor center with the exception of special assistance animals.
  • Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site is prohibited.

Additional Park Policies


Firearms in National Parks: The law governing possession of firearms inside a national park changed on February 22, 2010. Visitors may possess firearms within a national park unit provided they comply with federal, state, and local laws. The role of the responsible gun owner is to know and obey the federal, state, and local laws appropriate to the park they are visiting. Please remember that federal law prohibits firearms in certain park facilities and buildings. These places are marked with signs at public entrances. The role of the responsible gun owner is to know and obey the federal, state, and local laws appropriate to the park they are visiting. For more information about gun laws in Pennsylvania, please visit the Pennsylvania State Police web site.

The Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center is owned and operated by the Gettysburg Foundation, which also owns and administers the grounds and parking lots adjacent to the building. The carrying or possession of any type of weapon on the grounds of the visitor center or in the building is prohibited. Exceptions: Law enforcement officers or officials that are within their jurisdiction.

Civil War Reenactments in National Parks


Gettysburg National Military Park hosts volunteer Civil War groups throughout most of the year. These groups follow strict guidelines as to the context of the camps, equipment displays, and any demonstration where historic weapons are discharged. Park hosted "living history weekends" are by invitation to specific groups and do not entail any battle recreations, which are prohibited on Federal property. For further information about these regulations, follow the link to the National Park Service Policy on Re-enactments in national parks.


ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • APA
  • Standard
  • Harvard
  • Vancouver
  • Author
  • BIBTEX
  • RIS

Research output : Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review

T1 - MR imaging of 'spray heads'

T2 - Toluene abuse via aerosol paint inhalation

N2 - PURPOSE: Three male patients with a history of spray-paint inhalation are presented. METHODS: Spin-echo MR was used to evaluate the central nervous system changes secondary to toluene inhalation delivered via spray-paint fumes. RESULTS: The remarkable findings included the loss of cerebral and cerebellar gray-white matter discrimination, scattered multifocal deep white matter lesions, and gross generalized atrophy of the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the corpus callosum. CONCLUSION: Although the observed changes are nonspecific, combined with a positive history the diagnosis of inhalation toluene abuse can be made on the basis of consistent MR findings.

AB - PURPOSE: Three male patients with a history of spray-paint inhalation are presented. METHODS: Spin-echo MR was used to evaluate the central nervous system changes secondary to toluene inhalation delivered via spray-paint fumes. RESULTS: The remarkable findings included the loss of cerebral and cerebellar gray-white matter discrimination, scattered multifocal deep white matter lesions, and gross generalized atrophy of the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the corpus callosum. CONCLUSION: Although the observed changes are nonspecific, combined with a positive history the diagnosis of inhalation toluene abuse can be made on the basis of consistent MR findings.


Rhebal SP-1195 - History

Your browser is out of date and affecting your experience. Please upgrade Internet Explorer to the latest version.

Bid History for Lot of 10 (M/L) National Time Wall Clocks Model 030-12EX HH SP
Auction Start Date: 02/20/16 10:23 AM ET
Auction End Date: 03/02/16 4:05 PM ET
Asset ID: 62 Number of Bids: 11

Lot of 10 (M/L) National Time Wall Clocks Model 030-12EX HH SP
Auction Closed
High Bidder: m****2
Sold Amount: $56.55
Tax (8.850000%): $5.00
Buyer's Premium (12.50%): $7.07
Total Price: $68.62
View Bid History
Terms and Conditions
Questions and Answers There are currently no questions posted for this asset.
Inspection
Most items offered for sale are used and may contain defects not immediately detectable. Bidders may inspect the property prior to bidding. Removal or Inspection are available by APPOINTMENT ONLY. Appointments are generally available Monday – Friday from 9 AM – 3 PM Central. Please contact Eric Tangen (913) 239-4070 or Email [email protected] to schedule removal or an inspection. Kansas State Law prohibits smoking in or on any Blue Valley School District property. Compliance is required

PAYMENT MUST BE MADE ONLINE -- To make online payment, log into your GovDeals account and select 'My Bids'. Please follow the instructions there.

Payment in full is due not later than five (5) business days from the time and date of the Buyer's Certificate. Payment must be made electronically through the GovDeals Website. Payment Methods are listed above.

TAX EXEMPTION: Where taxes are applicable (see the Buyer's Certificate), Tax Exempt documents must be provided to this seller within 24 hours of the auctions close and before payment is made. Please see the contact below for any questions.

The Buyer will make all arrangements and perform all work necessary, including packing, loading and transportation of the property. No Assistance will be provided. A daily storage fee of $10.00 may be charged for any item not removed within the 10 business days allowed and stated on the Buyer's Certificate. Kansas State Law prohibits smoking in or on any Blue Valley School District property. Compliance is required

Special Instructions NOTICE: If you are the winning bidder and default by failing to adhere to this sellers terms and conditions your account with GovDeals WILL BE LOCKED.

Guaranty Waiver. All property is offered for sale 'AS IS, WHERE IS.' Blue Valley School District No. 229, KS makes no warranty, guaranty or representation of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the merchantability or fitness for any purpose of the property offered for sale. Please note that upon removal of the property, all sales are final.

Description Warranty. Seller warrants to the Buyer that the property offered for sale will conform to its description. Any claim for misdescription must be made prior to removal of the property. If Seller confirms that the property does not conform to the description, Seller will keep the property and refund any money paid. The liability of the seller shall not exceed the actual purchase price of the property.


Volunteer much? MOW NCRY style

Railroadforums.com is a free online Railroad Discussion Forum and Railroad Photo Gallery for railroaders, railfans, model railroaders and anyone else who is interested in railroads. We cover a wide variety of topics, including freight trains, passenger and commuter railroads, rail news and information, tourist railroads, railway museums and railroad history.

Momagna

Member

NCRY is an all volunteer organization. There are many different options for volunteers from ticket sales, car repair, train crew, bush wacking and PLENTY for the MOW groups.

There are actually two different MOW groups one on the first Saturday which builds track in the new Valley Section heading East to Pleasanton, CA. The main MOW volunteer group is WEDMOW Wednesday Maintenance of Way where they meet at 8:00 AM every Wednesday (except during Train of Lights (TOL) where they work as train crew and Santa (you will see why).

Many of our volunteers have had previous experience working on trains but not all. Some aspire to be hired by the railroads such as UP but most are retired and wanting to have the cheapest work out gym available. For $48.00 per year anyone can join the PLA (Pacific Locomotive Association) and then you can ride the trains every Sunday for free. While most memebrs do not volunteer at least 120 do volunteer.

MOW is the workhorse of the PLA where all track repairs, painting, graffiti removal is done, where technical repairs are completed on a weekly basis.

Need to lose weight? Gain muscle, slim down for a cruise, tired of fighting for a parking space at a stuffy gym? Well come on out to the yard and get to work!

Momagna

Member

Smoke Chaser Smoke Chaser was used to follow steam locomotives and put our fires caused by the trains. NCRY now uses her as a transportation vehicle. First there s ALWAYS a long list of TO-DO'S for the MOW crew. After having a briefing session and then moving equipment around to get the right flat cars, the blue room (toilet), compressor car etc. We are all ready to head to our volunteer assignment. Some of the assignments are welcomed while others are dreaded. We have about 6 to 8 regular volunteers so there might be three jobs for the day with three groups heading out onto the track.

Bolt tightening is most likely the least favorite as we have 6 miles of track we run weekly on. Just like the Golden Gate Bridge painting, bolt tightening NEVER gets completed. Once you get to the last ones the time is already started on the first bolts tightened a year or so ago. Every bolt is tightened by hand. some bolts seem to be one size while two other bolts happen to be a totally different size so wrenches do not always fit two bolts on the same joint.

List of site sources >>>


Watch the video: The history of southern pacific SW900 1195 (January 2022).